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Discovering

Discovering, searching and finding your own individuality is found through the journey of your life. Human experiences encompasses a wide range of conceptions about life and loss validated by memory. Jane Harrison creates a meaning through her exploration of these metaphysical forces and their impact on human experiences. Human experiences has a big impact in Harrison’s play “Rainbow’s End”, without these experiences life wouldn’t have a purpose and would be worthless. Jane Harrison an indigenous novelist, writer and researcher at the age of 58. Harrison shows three aboriginal women Gladys, Nan Dear and Dolly living together during the 1950s where there was a massive social economic divide. These characters share collective and individual human experiences, especially Nan Dear and Dolly. A sense of sense- discovery is important within their culture as they are left out of the white society. Racial tension could be seen between the aboriginals and the settlers or more commonly known as the “settlers”.

Nan Dear represents the ‘old ways’, as she is the voice for traditional Aboriginal customs and beliefs. Gladys represents passive Aboriginal discontent as she wants to be apart of the white society and will not act against it to bring change for her people. Sometimes in the community Gladys feels as if she’s not accepted therefore she’s finding it hard to discover her own identity. Dolly is spiritually connected to place and family which everyone wants to see her succeed. Aboriginals believe that they are all closely related so that they always have to be together, however, Whites are usually individualists who just care about their ‘own’ family” thus they haven’t had to consider the place where they belong.

The immortal power of memory preserve human experiences despite the finite nature of existence. Jane Harrison creates meaning regarding human existence on aboriginal people through exploration of these metaphysical conceptions in the play “Rainbows End”.