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“Powerful images help to make significant ideas memorable in texts

“Powerful images help to make significant ideas memorable in texts.” Explain how this is evident in at least two of the prescribed short stories and another text of your choosing.

Thesis: Powerful language has the ability to allow us to feel empathy. It is not until you are put in someone else’s shoes that you get a full insight into the hardships they have endured or of which they are currently battling.

Contextual: Henry Lawson is an influential Australian composer of many short stories and sketches. His use of distinctively visual language and imagery created many memorable images and personas as well as engaging the responders with his harsh depiction of the Australian bush and the Australian values of the time. Lawson’s work has played a major role in the development of Australia’s national identity and the expression of the values and beliefs of Australia during that era. His work was first published by the Bulletin in 1887 which was an influential publication which promoted Australianism, egalitarianism, and unionism. At the time of his pieces being published the world through Lawson’s eyes appealed to the everyday Australian as it was deemed relatable by many. His pieces still continue to remain relevant and influence modern audiences.
Introduction: The establishment of images through the use of distinctively visual language in Henry Lawson’s “The Drovers Wife” and “The Bush Undertaker” helps make significant ideas memorable about the landscape and inaugurates a connection to the personas of the people of the bush. While Kriv Stender’s film “Red Dog” diverges Lawson’s pieces implying a positive in comparison to a negative connotation towards the lifestyle in the outback of Australia.
Landscape:
Characters/people:
Conclusion:
The Drovers Wife
In the opening paragraph of Henry Lawson’s piece “The Drovers Wife” he immediately establishes the harshness and the isolation of the Australian bush. The responders are instantly faced with negative visuals and auricular of “the stunted, rotten native apple trees” and “a few she oaks……. sighing above the narrow, almost waterless creek.” in which it juxtaposes “the gaunt sun-browned woman” and her “four ragged, dried up looking children.” Lawson’s emphasis on the depiction of the harsh landscape and the people of the bush shapes our Australian identity as the inhabitants are “battling” the harsh lifestyle of the bush in the relentless, unforgiving environment.
The Drovers Wife Landscape:
The Drovers Wife Charatcers:
The Bush Undertaker (landscape/characters)
Lawson presents striking images of the harshness of the Australian outback and reveals how the personas of characters are shaped by the landscapes. Establishing the hardships and troubles of living in the outback at the time contrasts the “city life” living. Lawson’s “The Bush Undertaker” conveys the harsh, dry landscape through descriptions of the conditions of the environment being a “broiling Christmas day” and the surroundings consisting of “the bank of a barren creek.” This imagery suggests that there is often extreme heat and it is nothing out of the ordinary for the people “living out back” as well as the potential dangers of being in an isolated environment. He concludes his story with “and the sun sank again on the grand Australian bush – the nurse and tutor of eccentric minds, the home of the weird.” The personification furthermore suggests that the intensity of the landscape is crucial in shaping the Australian character and its identity.
The Bush Undertaker Landscape:
The Bush Undertaker Characters:
Red Dog
Lawson’s “The Drovers Wife” and “The Bush Undertaker” depict a dark, harsh, negative connotation towards living in the bush whereas Kriv Stender’s film “Red Dog” presents a light-hearted, enjoyable, positive lifestyle living in the Australian outback.
Red Dog Landscape:
Red Dog Characters: